Professional WINE label design

$80
1
Delivery in
5 days

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What you get with this Hourlie

A wine label has very little space so every element must be chosen for maximum impact. First things first: who are you and what’s your story? A century-old vineyard in France might want to communicate to a potential customer that they are trusted, historic brand, making them a solid investment. While an upstart winemaker in Oregon might want to sell to younger, more adventurous buyer looking for something unique and new. Figure out how to tell that story in an engaging way in only a sentence or two, while also describing the particulars of that bottle.

Color - Wine has pretty standard bottle colors: reds are sold in dark green bottles to keep out the sunlight and prevent oxidization, while whites are sold in clear or pale green bottles. The first step to choosing a color scheme for your label is making sure it pops on the bottle the wine will be sold in. Reds traditionally follow two color schemes: dark, deep colors creating a moody feel, or a white label with rich ink colors. White wine labels tend to go for light blues and greens, creating airey or crisp feelings. And whites, golds and pinks reign supreme for sparkling and the super trendy roses.

Typography - If you do choose dark label on a red, make sure your typography is strong enough bring contrast to your design. The font you choose for your label will tell the consumer a lot about the what they’ll be uncorking. Traditional wineries use busier typeface styles and design that evoke their history and authenticity. The labels often rely on serifed or script type. Modern, hip wineries often use bold, sans serif faces to lend a contemporary feel.

Style and imagery - The most popular styles tend to fall into a couple categories: elegant, bold and modern, minimalist or classic/traditional. Pick yours based on the personality of your wine, your brand, and your drinkers. Going for an older, more sophisticated drinker with a high price point? You might want to stay traditional. Attempting to draw in millennial drinkers who are beginning to collect and develop their palettes? Perhaps you’re better off with something clean and modern....

What about the back of your wine label? While this can be interesting stuff like vineyard history and tasting notes, you must also must include less-fun legal information like government warnings, ABV and UPC codes (if you’re planning on selling in stores). Make sure you research all of these requirements and provide them to me.

Get more with Hourlie Add-ons

  • I can create photorealistic bottle image with your label

    Requires no additional time

    +$12
  • I can deliver all work in 2 working days
    +$37

What the Seller needs to start the work

Label size, theme wine name, vintage, variety or blend etc.

1. WINE NAME

2. HOW DID YOU COME UP WITH THE NAME? (ANY BACKGROUND IS USEFUL)

3. VARIETAL

4. YEAR (IF REQUIRED)

5. BOTTLE STYLE/COLOUR

6. OTHER BRANDS IN YOUR PORTFOLIO/EXAMPLES OF CURRENT LABELS (PLEASE SEND PHOTOS, ARTWORK ETC)
NAME OF VINEYARD

7. WHO IS THE WINE AIMED AT?

8. WHAT TYPE OF PEOPLE DO YOU THINK WILL BUY THE WINE?

9. HOW MUCH WILL IT SELL FOR?

10. WHICH ROUTE TO MARKET DO YOU WANT TO PURSUE? (RETAIL, ON TRADE, OFF TRADE)

11. WHAT DESIGN FEEL DO YOU WANT FOR THE LABEL? (CONTEMPORARY, CLASSIC... ANY EXAMPLES OF STYLE/OVERALL LOOK YOU WANT TO ACHIEVE? ANY FEELINGS OR METAPHORS THAT REFLECT THIS SPIRIT?)

12. WHO DO YOU SEE AS THE COMPETITION?

13. MANDATORY INCLUSIONS AND GUIDELINES (DETAILS OF ANY OTHER LOGOS/INFORMATION WHICH MUST APPEAR - ANY CORPORATE REQUIREMENTS? LOGOS? IMAGERY?)